Cost-Effectiveness

Study Finds pVADs are Cost-Effective for High-Risk PCI

In the era of increasing healthcare costs, the cost-effectiveness of traditional versus emerging technologies is an ongoing consideration when evaluating long-term outcomes. A meta-analysis derived from six studies (Maini et al. 2014) determined that percutaneous ventricular assist devices (pVADs), particularly the Impella 2.5® heart pump, were cost effective in the setting of high-risk PCI, when compared to the IABP.  “The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of Impella 2.5 was below the standard willingness-to-pay threshold.”

Of the studies reviewed, Gregory et al. 2013 and Roos et al. 2013 assessed the economic benefit of the Impella 2.5 alone in high-risk PCI patients, as shown below:

 

Studies Evaluating the Cost Effectiveness of the Impella 2.5 device for High-Risk PCI*

Study and Study Design Comparators Age (years)

Gender

(% male)

Results and Conclusions

Gregory et al. 2013

Retrospective cost analysis plus cost utility analysis

IABP

--n=211

68 80.6

pVAD reduced major adverse events, readmission length of stay and readmission cost over 90-days

Cost effective long term

Roos et al. 2013

Cost utility analysis

IABP

Impella 2.5

--USpella

n=175

--Europella

n=144

ECMO

NR**

70

72

NR

NR

70

81

NR

pVAD cost effective for high risk PCI compared to IABP

* Table adapted from Tables 1 and 2, Maini et al. 2014.

**NR=not reported

The authors concluded the cost reductions associated with the Impella 2.5 makes it “a high-value technology.”

 

 

View more resources